V-Track — A Revolution in optic technology

It is Beyond the Optical, Laser and Blue-ray…

It has been more than half a century ago, that Dr. Douglas Englebart invented the first mouse back in 1968. The mouse tracking technology then initiated with mechanical decoding, and was generationally developed to optical, laser and Blue-ray. All systems are now coexisting in today’s market, yet none of them is able to completely resolve the adaptability issue. Why do all mice still require a mouse pad to function properly? This question puzzles most mouse fans daily. Wouldn’t it be great if there was a new and superior technology to resolve this adaptability issue and liberate us from mouse pads once and for all?

The Principle and Imperfections of the 1st Generation Mouse Engines

The sensor of an optical mouse works like a mini camcorder. It utilizes basic photography by applying a slanted incident LED light on the surface. The sensor captures continuous images and differentiates the image features. This data is used for calculating the vector values and determines the direction and speed of cursor movement. It uses scattered reflective light to illuminate the objective, see the illustration above as shown.

Simply to say, if you want to move the cursor on a very glossy or over a rough surface, you will find that the cursor is sluggish or doesn’t even move at all.

Traditional Optical Mouse Adaptability Analysis

While working on glass, the LED light will pass through and bounce off the transparent glass surface. In these situations, the sensor is not able to find enough shadow points. Consequently the cursor is sluggish or almost dead.

While the regular optical mouse working on the multi-color or plaid pattern surfaces (e.g., a mouse pad), the generated shadow points /images change constantly and disorderly. The sensor is unable to track the motion precisely and leads the cursor to jump or lag problems. Therefore, it much relies upon a good quality mouse pad so as to improve such discrepancies.

Principle and adaptability problems of Laser Mouse

The Laser mouse also utilizes an optical technology, but it replaces the LED with a laser diode. Due to the great coherence of lasers, it can keep its strength even over a long distance.

When the laser beam illuminates the surface, it will generate interference fringes and form beam spots. The sensor of a laser mouse captures the images of beam spots. Comparing with the working principle of traditional optical mice, laser mice can more easily identify the generated image because of bigger image differences.

However, Laser mice also utilize slanted light. It cannot work on glossy surface or on glass, because no interference fringes captured. Besides, laser diodes are known for their high cost and high malfunction rate, caused by weak anti-static capability.

Principle and adaptability problems of BlueTrack Mouse
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Blue Track mice utilize a blue LED. Compared to the traditional red LED, the only difference is just a shorter wave length. Blue Track uses the same working principle as the laser mouse: blue LED light focuses through the lens and illuminates the surface. Due to the slanted angle off the light, also BlueTrack does not function properly on 3D surface such as furs.

Time to draw conclusions. Regardless of the use of regular optical, laser or Blue track technology, all of mice have cursor control problems due to the slanted light, especially on surfaces like glass, marble, textiles, fur, etc. After our analysis and experiments, it is s. Regardless of the use of regular optical, laser or Blue track technology, all of mice have cursor control problems due to the slanted light, especially on surfaces like glass, marble, textiles, fur, etc. After our analysis and experiments, it is apparent that the surface adaptability of these mice is far from perfect.